Sep 222014
 

Special Dr.’s call with Dr. Brad Eli

This is an excellent call by Dr. Brad Eli discussing the serverity of chronic pain cases he deals with daily and the success his patients have experienced using Nyloxin™. Dr. Eli’s practice is one of the few medical centers in the United States to focus on the treatment of headache and all forms of orofacial pain, including Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction, also known as the ‘suicide disease’. #tmj #migraine #nervepain

In my own testimonial, I describe the ” nothing short of amazing results I have experienced” since I began using this product. You can listen here: My Nyloxin personal testimonial. Don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or to share your experience with using Nyloxin. Wishing you health, wealth and blessings… Jacqui

 All-Natural, Safe and Effective Relief for Chronic Pain non-toxic – non-narcotic – non-steroidal no acetaminophen – no NSAIDS

Sep 152014
 

100 million American adults live with chronic pain. That’s more than cancer, diabetes and heart disease combined. According to the Institute of Medicine, the high prevalence of chronic pain suggests that the condition is not being adequately managed. Undertreatment of chronic pain creates large costs to the healthcare system and the U.S. economy; we spend more than $560 billion in the U.S. each year on chronic pain-related healthcare costs. Moreover, chronic pain can carry significant physical and emotional burdens.

The Institute of Medicine has called for a better understanding of the impact of pain in an effort to reduce its toll on the people who suffer from it including the impact on their economic, physical and emotional wellbeing.

Pain Matters seeks to do just that. The documentary explores what chronic pain is, its individual and societal impact, and the future of pain management through the stories and struggles of six individuals living with chronic pain and their loved ones, as well as perspective from leading national experts in pain management. For more information about chronic pain and the documentary, please click here.

Watch the show!
http://www.painmattersfilm.com/ ;

Source: www.painmattersfilm.com

My local channel lineup didn’t offer this last year. Now it’s available online!

 All-Natural, Safe and Effective Pain Relief non-toxic – non-narcotic – non-steroidal
no acetaminophen – no NSAIDS

Aug 302014
 

The Evolution of Medicine Summit Do you know what medicine will look like in 5-10 years and how it will affect you?

You should!

40 trusted world leaders in health!
Free online event!

 

Medicine is evolving to solve the modern epidemics of chronic disease, such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and a range of autoimmune diseases. Our summit intends to not only shine a light on the work of those visionaries and innovators leading this evolution, but also set a unique vision for a more evolved healthcare system. This vision is patient-centric, empowered, proactive and participatory.

We’ve created separate tracks for health consumers and health professionals for the Evolution of Medicine Summit. However, please feel free to enjoy all of the information no matter your profession or state of health!

Register Here

 

Dec 182013
 


By Karen Weintraub
Special for USA TODAY

Fibromyalgia affects 1% to 5% of Americans, mainly women, but until recently, scientists had no idea what might be causing its severe and mysterious pains. For decades, doctors told patients their agony was imaginary, the result of emotional hysteria, not a physical ailment.

But this year, researchers finally began to get a handle on the condition.

“What’s happened is in 2013 there’s been this absolute explosion of papers,” says neurologist Anne Louise Oaklander at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. “The whole view on this has shifted.”

Oaklander published two studies this year showing that half or more of the cases of fibromyalgia are really a little-known condition affecting the nerves. People with this small-fiber neuropathy get faulty signals from tiny nerves all over the body, including internal organs, causing an odd constellation of symptoms from pain to sleep and digestive problems that overlap with symptoms of fibromyalgia.

Neuroscientist Frank Rice and a team based at Albany Medical College also discovered that there are excessive nerve fibers lining the blood vessels of the skin of fibromyalgia patients – removing any doubt that the condition is physically real.

These fibers in the skin can sense blood flow and control the dilation and constriction of vessels to regulate body temperature, Rice says, as well as direct nutrients to muscles during exercise. Women have more of these fibers than men, he says, perhaps explaining why they are much more likely to get fibromyalgia.

“Blood vessel nerve fibers are an important target that haven’t been in our line of thinking to date in chronic pain conditions,” says Rice, now president and chief scientist at Integrated Tissue Dynamics LLC, a biotechnology research company in Rensselaer, N.Y.

In recent years, scans of patients with fibromyalgia have revealed brain changes associated with pain, but the new research suggests these are a symptom rather than the cause of the condition. Read the full article…

Sep 242013
 
A Map of Chronic Pain

A Map of Chronic Pain

Brain’s white matter may determine susceptibility to chronic pain

Scientists used the structure of the brain’s white matter (green lines) to predict whether a subject would recover from low back pain. Red dots represent differences in white matter structure between subjects who recovered and who suffered chronic pain. Courtesy of Apkarian lab, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

The structure of the brain may predict whether a person will suffer chronic low back pain, according to researchers who used brain scans. The results, published in the journal Pain, support the growing idea that the brain plays a critical role in chronic pain, a concept that may lead to changes in the way doctors treat patients. The research was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

“We may have found an anatomical marker for chronic pain in the brain,” said Vania Apkarian, Ph.D., a senior author of the study and professor of physiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Chronic pain affects nearly 100 million Americans and costs the United States up to $635 billion per year to treat. According to the Institute of Medicine, an independent research organization, chronic pain affects a growing number of people.

“Pain is becoming an enormous burden on the public. The U.S. government recently outlined steps to reduce the future burden of pain through broad-ranging efforts, including enhanced research,” said Linda Porter, Ph.D, the pain policy advisor at NINDS and a leader of NIH’s Pain Consortium. “This study is a good example of the kind of innovative research we hope will reduce chronic pain which affects a huge portion of the population.”

Low back pain represents about 28 percent of all causes of pain in the United States; about 23 percent of these patients suffer chronic, or long-term, low back pain.

Pain in the Brain with Dr. Vania Apkarian
Apkarian on Pain

Watch Dr. Vania Apkarian discuss the relationship between lower back pain and the brain.
Scientists have thought the cause of low back pain could be found at the site of injury. However, recent studies suggest that the brain may be more involved with chronic pain.

“Currently we know very little about why some patients suffer chronic low back pain,” said Debra Babcock, M.D., Ph.D., a program director at NINDS. “The earlier we detect pain will become chronic, the better we may be able to treat patients.”

Dr. Apkarian and his colleagues addressed this by scanning the brains of 46 people who had low back pain for about three months before coming to the hospital but who had not had any pain for at least a year before.

Continue reading full article…